Home News Reviews Forums Shop


Sony Hit With Another Blu-ray Patent Lawsuit

Blu-ray Disc Writers, BD Combo and BD-ROM Drives

Sony Hit With Another Blu-ray Patent Lawsuit

Postby Ian on Fri Jun 01, 2007 10:25 am

Certicom has filed a suit against Sony, claiming that Advanced Access Control System (AACS) and Digital Transmission Content Protection (DTCP) violate patents for Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC).

http://www.certicom.com/index.php?actio ... e&view=697

The patents-in-suit are two of Certicom's fundamental patents used in consumer electronics, in particular its world-leading version of Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC). In its complaint, Certicom alleges Sony has, and continues to, infringe, contribute to and induce the infringement of Certicom's patents by making, using, importing, offering for sale and selling their products in the U.S. without being licensed by Certicom to do so. These patents are related to content protection technologies, including Advanced Access Control System (AACS) used in Blu-ray and Digital Transmission Content Protection (DTCP) used in wired and wireless distribution of compression audio and video. Products affected include Playstation 3, DVD players, VAIO personal computers and certain high definition TV models and audio equipment.


Personally, I think the lawsuit is kinda lame. They're obviously looking for money. If they were truly looking to protect their patents, they'd take it up with the AACS LA, which represents all licensees. Instead they went after Sony.

I don't know why the US Patent Office lets people patent this stuff anyway. According to Betanews, its nothing more than mathematical concept.

http://www.betanews.com/article/Certico ... 1180557165

Rather than try to reduce the size of public keys, ECC borrows from the notion that both these primes can be represented as points on an elliptic curve. The curve can then be represented by geometric coordinates, in such a way that any point on the curve multiplied by an integer will yield another point on the same curve. So once the formula knows how to interpret the curve, an algorithm can derive the primes involved in the cryptographic calculations, which also fall on that curve.

The underlying math is perhaps centuries old, and Certicom itself offers a public tutorial on elliptic curves on its own Web site.

Certicom apparently patented the concept of elliptic curve mathematics in cryptography as soon as it could following the first suggestion of its use in 1985, by a fellow Certicom admits worked for IBM at the time. It since filed subsequent patents on variations of its use, including #6,563,928, "Strengthened public key protocol," which describes the use of exponentiation as a technique for placing the very large numbers required for high-bit cryptography into a smaller, more manageable group.


As far as DTCP goes, Intel is the creator. Why not sue them?

http://www.intel.com/standards/case/case_dtcp.htm
"Blu-ray is just a bag of hurt." - Steve Jobs
User avatar
Ian
Grand Poobah
 
Posts: 14882
Joined: Sun Apr 08, 2001 2:34 pm
Location: Madison, WI

Postby Wesociety on Fri Jun 01, 2007 12:48 pm

Yeah, it sounds pretty absurd that a mathematical concept can be patented. What's next, a patent on using multiplication with encryption? Oh wait, that's pretty much what they patented...
http://WesleyTech.com <- Blu-ray Disc & consumer technology news, opinions & articles
User avatar
Wesociety
CD-RW Player
 
Posts: 1234
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2004 11:33 am
Location: Phoenix, AZ

Postby SithTracy on Fri Jun 01, 2007 2:09 pm

Wesociety wrote:Yeah, it sounds pretty absurd that a mathematical concept can be patented. What's next, a patent on using multiplication with encryption? Oh wait, that's pretty much what they patented...
Only in America...
User avatar
SithTracy
CD-RW Player
 
Posts: 600
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 6:18 pm
Location: S.E. WI, U.S.A.


Return to Blu-ray Disc Drives

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

All Content is Copyright (c) 2001-2017 CDRLabs Inc.