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burning slower vs. lifespan

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burning slower vs. lifespan

Postby fatmav on Thu Feb 09, 2006 7:19 pm

This is a question out of my curiosity.

First, by "burning slower", I mean for instance burning a disc at a non-maximum speed. (Like burning a 8x disc at 4x or even 2x.)

My question is: is there any reason to believe that burning slower is good for the lifespan of the recordable? Perhaps by burning slower, we allow the laser to burn at the dye for a slightly longer time, hence allowing the dye to "settle" a bit more?

Thanks!
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Re: burning slower vs. lifespan

Postby ItalianJob on Thu Feb 09, 2006 7:33 pm

Most DVD drive are optimized for burning DVD discs at least at rated speed. Burning at lower speed will produce nothing else that poor quality (high PIE/PIF/jitter...) on good and average blank discs.

But I admit that a 4X burn could help with Ritek discs and other poor quality 8X media.
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Postby dolphinius_rex on Thu Feb 09, 2006 7:35 pm

On a lot of media, the best results can be found at no less then half their rated speed. Some drive/media combinations however, work best at the rated speed, or even one step above!

In the case of Verbatim DVD+RDL, I think 4x almost always outperforms 2.4x recording.
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Postby frank1 on Fri Feb 10, 2006 2:31 am

My personal opinion is that
a "slow dye" for a DVD R is more important than a slow burn

I think that a 4x certified dye is "harder under the laser" than a 16x dye
because the new 16x dyes must be manufactured to react quicker to the laser power.
So once burned at it's rated speed of 4x or even a bit slower ( 2x or 2.4x) a slow dye is "settled" fo a longer lifespan.

I also know that the nominal laser power of the laser had to be increased by at least 50% for the DL capable burners (in order to reach properly the second layer below)
Often for these burners the slower burning speeds are then missing.
Example: the Pioneer 108 cannot burn anymore at 1x.
For some new burners and MID codes the slowest possible speed seems to be even 4x.

So I wonder if the new DL burners are still capable to modulate this increased laser power in order to burn properly at low speeds (lets's say 2x or 4x in CLV mode)
or if the excessive laser power is going to "make big holes" in the dye at these slow speeds.
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Postby dolphinius_rex on Fri Feb 10, 2006 3:45 am

frank1 wrote:My personal opinion is that
a "slow dye" for a DVD R is more important than a slow burn

I think that a 4x certified dye is "harder under the laser" than a 16x dye
because the new 16x dyes must be manufactured to react quicker to the laser power.
So once burned at it's rated speed of 4x or even a bit slower ( 2x or 2.4x) a slow dye is "settled" fo a longer lifespan.

I also know that the nominal laser power of the laser had to be increased by at least 50% for the DL capable burners (in order to reach properly the second layer below)
Often for these burners the slower burning speeds are then missing.
Example: the Pioneer 108 cannot burn anymore at 1x.
For some new burners and MID codes the slowest possible speed seems to be even 4x.

So I wonder if the new DL burners are still capable to modulate this increased laser power in order to burn properly at low speeds (lets's say 2x or 4x in CLV mode)
or if the excessive laser power is going to "make big holes" in the dye at these slow speeds.


But drives that can't burn DVD-R or DVD+R media at 2x or 1x, can still burn DVD-RWs at 2x (and yes even 1x sometimes!!). So I'd say it's probably more that drive makers don't want the option to be available. Newer dyes do not take well to very low speed burning... 16x media often will not burn well at 4x even! :o
Punch Cards -> Paper Tape -> Tape Drive -> 8" Floppy Diskette -> 5 1/4" Floppy Diskette -> 3 1/2" "Flippy" Diskette -> CD-R -> DVD±R -> BD-R

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