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Copy VCRs to DVD

Video editing, capturing, converting, etc.

Copy VCRs to DVD

Postby Graham35 on Mon Mar 06, 2006 5:13 am

My friend is trying to copy his "purchased VCR" to his computer to then burn to DVD. He has some hardware to allow the capture from his VCR to the computer.
His problem is that when he burns to DVD there seems to be a split second break every 10 seconds or so - we pressume this is probably the video security device to stop the copy of the video.

We know that its easy to copy DVDs with anydvd and clonedvd, but is there such software to remove the security code from the video.

I would appriciate some help and advice with this.

Many thanks
Graham
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Postby Jim on Mon Mar 06, 2006 11:48 am

If this is analog macrovision you need an intermediate Time Based Corrector (TBC) or a VCR with one integrated like the higher end JVC models. The problem exists with the signal between the VCR and computer. It's too late once it is on the computer to "remove" anything to fix it.

The best way to transfer VCR tapes to a PC is using a JVC model VCR with a TBC (if a commercial tape) and a camcorder, like a Sony, that converts from analog to digital on the fly into a .AVI file (DV Codec). Then use a multipass MPG2 encoder to convert to a DVD source.
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Postby Justin42 on Mon Mar 06, 2006 1:52 pm

Even the JVC VCRs are now supposed to honor Macrovision -- they detect it before the TBC. You'll need some sort of external TBC (or possibly an older JVC model -- not sure how old) to really strip Macrovision.

I will say 'jerkiness' isn't usually what you see when a tape is protected-- usually you either get VERY severe full-screen light/dark fluctuations, or the equipment will just refuse to record and pop up an error.

I am wondering if it's a problem with the capture device-- software conflict, IRQ conflict, massively fragmented hard drive, corrupt media encoders, etc... what kind of device is he using?
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Postby Graham35 on Sun Mar 12, 2006 2:31 pm

Thanks for your help guys.
He now says he is going to trial a combination DVD writer and VCR directly connected to his TV and copy the video direct to DVD......... I hope it works for him as it will save a lot of time - if it don´t work he will send the machine back to the store.

thanks for your help
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Postby Justin42 on Sun Mar 12, 2006 5:58 pm

For 95% of people, set top DVD recorders are a much, much better solution. Even if you know what you're doing, for a lot of casual purposes (archiving TV shows for personal viewing, etc) set top boxes are just so much easier to deal with than computer setups.

If you want a professional edit and look to it, yeah, a computer is your only way, but if you're just doing quick-and-dirty stuff the set top units really do an amazing job.
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